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when we saw a deficit and policy toion is being designed rebalance the economy's and we're seeing that happen. while the trade deficits are coming down, the demand for products from emerging markets, whether commodities or manufactured goods, that demand is not growing as fast as it was when trade deficits were expanding. the markets are going to find the environment stuff. what is the concern china or deflation? >> i don't think there will be deflation and i think we will see a long time of low growth. i don't think inflation will be a problem. of alarm also it's bells and i like to put the word demand in front of deflation. and thatalling wages means following command and a negative spiral. it is not just falling prices. is lots of sectors. you see groups and things like that. falling realu have wages that that is the problem. the cycle that japan went through and if you do not touch it at the right time, it is difficult to turn around. are we in a scenario like that? deflation and the specter of it hanging over us unless handled correctly. >> one of the characteristics of japan
issue right now, deficit, debt, from the ministrations point of view, it is not something are focusing on right now. >> take you for setting the scene. -- thank you for setting the scene. york, our guest host, we have the chart of earlier. it is a massive victory lap. can we get back to a surplus? can we get back to that surplus? >> that is certainly not on the near-term horizon. what is important to note, three years ago the deficit was 10% of tdp and this year, 3%. it wasn't pretty. it didn't look like the civics textbooks, but we have a lot of deficit reduction. we had the ryan murphy agreement. it basically takes fiscal policy off the table for the next two years. barring a dramatic or election outcome in november, the administration will be status quo for 2017. >> are you willing to say austerity in the u.s. worked while austerity in europe did not work question mark -- work? able to register economic growth. it has been sluggish. europe has not been able to pull it off and a big impact of the fed he been the economy supported. >> the former fed governor, wonderful textbook, i don
to address the deficits, chronic deficits in the national flood insurance program. they are undoing the work to providing relief. the house will take up an energy will restrictich the epa's regulation of carbon emissions by coal-fired plants. this is a big priority of utilities. it would require any limits for new plants to be based on existing technology. it will be a theme this week. there will be several energy bills, just like there was a theme last week about excessive regulation. we thank bettelheim, you for the lookahead. as always sir, thank you for your time. >> my pleasure, sir. >> on the next washington journal, national review --umnist talks about us joins us to talk about the tea party. followed by brandywine garden -- eingarten. in thejoined with daniel council of foreign relations. washington journal is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern. what we're told, both as students and as a nation, is there are all kinds of siddons and marches and demonstrations and occur. -- sit in's marches and demonstrations that occur. barks --it was rosa basically, it was rosa parks and the young preacher w
? it is contained. we do not think it is a contagion threat. in the so-called double deficit countries, they are quite small in terms of their exposure to the developed market angst. opportunityke this to buy more emerging-market equities right now? intoe you still buying other equity markets, more developed markets in the u.s. and eurozone? >> it depends on your timeframe. over the next six months, i don't see a lot of triggers that will send the emerging markets story into a by scenario. i would be cautious. the valuation discount is about 30% and that is attractive. and lot of contagion risk that is psychology with the ukraine and other stories is scary so i would be cautious to neutral on emerging markets right now. have thena does not risk of contagion, you mentioned the fragile five, which might present a risk when we talk about the contagion to emerging markets? >> i don't think any of the fragile five are a risk in the developed markets for a couple reasons. they are tiny. take argentina and venezuela and put them together, less than half a point of global gdp. they are really
lending that will be done. in other words, the tax will go not to reduce the deficit or debt and it will be less lending. why would we be doing that? it makes no sense. spoke with a hunt representative and i want to get your take. to 25, and you are right, 99% of taxpayers will be at 25% or less. 99% and a when i was in school. what we do that is have trade-offs. >> back to the one percent argument. does this thing stand a snowballs chance in hell passing? >> for the bank tax, i hope not, cost -- because you will have less lending. the panel that i was on, and simpson bowles, better known to the general public, we all recommended dramatic reduction rates and elimination of most exemptions, deductions, and credits. that is the only way you solve the problem. if you go at it piecemeal, whether a bank tax on mortgage interest eduction, you never get it resolved. the reality is you want to balance the budget and get the debt in line with where it ought to be. you are going to have to do very dramatic things. i am glad that conversation is starting. you are known as one of the mos
. it's not getting its deficit under control. in front so that economic growth is always holding the covering supported by a brother to me to pick up truck in private consumption. europe's powerhouse germany could be in trouble selling a completely different way gemini is in showing steady growth thanks to blame domestic demand. but it's been criticized by other nations for escorting far more points than it imports that could be against eu worlds. grants commission is due to produce a report on the matter next week alternative markets now where we got a lot of mixed signals and trading in germany as a reporter at the frankfurt stock exchange the lead ups. these are good times for german companies for the big ones in the backs of all the more. basf has in the us prison as medical care the charter company a subsidiary of freezing spl presented solid results basf with a two thousand thirteen as good as never before. but it was not enough for investors. all three shares went down. indeed it is an answer and cousin yes medical care tumbled because of the results were a little bit wors
are often protected and many nato member states are serving as identify a deficit the military training areas throughout europe and north america are among the richest and most important sites will find that their city. often because they are that it's not open to the general . but also because if i am mental awareness and why stick to good use of natural resources is encouraged among soldiers military training areas are increasingly recognized as sites of high biodiversity and large numbers of threatened and endangered species. exports from india its beans and nine. listen to it in fooling you into watching it in two thousand that the ufc is the main import of indian spices contributed sixteen points and up until the next week i fly to a site i know that nine percent annually and maybe share each week six but since it's sunday a baby on the menu she jumped on singapore and the uk. i don't need to destinations for beginning sports it is that the european union to open them on this commendable that the ongoing sovereign debt crisis and four great books despite these problems from the out
differentiate as i look the key issue for me is who is dealing with a budget deficit or who is not raising interest rates. what is the critical issue for you? willdonesia for example mark itself out as different from the others. elsewhere,ine and don't be too concentrated in emerging markets. political risk is large and it is not very well-predicted by investors. do be well diversified. take some overweight and underweight positions. we tend to be overweight the small countries and underweight the largest ones. underweight the brics historically. that can be difficult when china is on a strong rally. good stead over the long term. >> what is going on in china? i come in everyday, we have the yuan on the move, we are trying to lure him the currency? there is something very interesting in the past couple of weeks in china. >> they have to squeeze the excess is out of the system and it is going to be painful. we talked about volatility earlier. we can expect that to spike up later in the year. there is going to be some headline news out of china as this credit excess is squeezed. i think the
's ever proposed for, not for reducing deficit but more domestic spending. we've had huge spending increases, so those are such nonstarters, i don't see how you get common ground. granted, we're living under another budget agreement for now. but it's clear he's moving farther to the left to try and -- for those reasons and he's not trying to move to the middle. >> congressman, you said that three times, he's moved to the left, it's a nonstarter. does that mean i can't ask you about closing loopholes or -- >> yeah, sure, go ahead. >> are there any ways in which you all could maybe come to something and end up with one or two or three of these things and get some of the things that you want? >> yeah, so we just -- our chairman of the ways and means committee, dave camp, put out a specific discussion draft of tax reform, which does just that. it closes loopholes. instead of using the money for spending which increases the deficit -- he has $1.8 trillion in tax increases, half goes for spending. we're saying take the loophole closures and use it to lower tax rates to grow the economy.
term on trying to boost job growth. over the ten-year window you will see steadily declining deficits. at the end the period i think you'll see a declining debt-to-gdp ratio. that's the right trajectory. >> yesterday we had warren buffett on the program. he said he thinks the proposal would be to boost the earned income tax credit even more, expand that in a bigger way. that's a way to boost wages for people that are working without looking at job losses by raising the minimum wage. how about offering it to a wider variety of people and taking the minimum wage proposal off the table? >> these things are not mutually exclusive. there's no reason you can't work at both ends here. >> is it something you would offer if you did a broad -- not what you're talking about right now, but boosting the income tax credit in a big way, offering it across the aisle as a way of finding compromise, in instead of looking at one from another. i think that would be something republicans would take on heartily. >> we're willing to consider any ideas republicans put on the table. the president is putting t
loss since the bailout in 2008. 15 billion-dollar deficit for last year. he calls rbs the industry's least trusted leader, does the ceo. >> the bank. the largest bailout in europe. still owns the vast majority of the bank and is still pulling the strings. >> by the way, wire pros playing in the olympics? >> that is what the nhl is asking -- the players love it. >> the players love it and flagwavers love it, i am not fair -- sure it is fair to college athletes. >> we need to go to the ukraine. we spoke with the new leadership to read good morning. >> good morning. his name is arseniy yatsenyuk, the prime minister designate. inis about it -- to be voted as the interim prime minister of the country for the next few months. parliament is still chewing over this decision. >> how front and center is crimea to the management in kiev? >> very front and center. i was standing in the parliament here in kiev. meanwhile, in the crimea, the parliament had just been seized by a group of about 100 gunmen. i asked the prime minister about that and he said it is the first crisis he has to deal with
a dime to the deficit. >> the president also wants to expand the earned income tax credit for the working poor without children. his budget would also expand the child and dependent care tax credit and create automatic iras to help workers save for retirement but it's unlikely those plans will get through congress. he needs legislation to enact all of that and that does not look likely. >>> global markets are rebounding today as investors digest the situation in ukraine. even the dow jones flew out of the gate this morning. alison kosik is over at the new york stock exchange. how much have we bounced back today? >> quite a bit. what a difference a day makes. even the s&p 500 at a record high. the dow up 200 points, 205 points. all 30 stocks in the dow are in the green. very different story yesterday. it was a sea of red. we also saw that turn-around happening overseas, all the way -- there were those down arrows we saw yesterday in europe, asia, russia, they all turned up today. analysts say investors today aren't on red alert. it's not such a dire situation. i think when putin spoke and
on the largest deficit is one that is pretty sudden. they will behind going with the smaller parties and it is like a game of cricket. but they really want to see is to find the stable location that will bring in certainty and bring it back to the table. we will see that by the 16th of may. the upcomingout indian elections. >> when we come back, we will hear more about microsoft and the somebody who knows a thing or two about it. stay with us here on "countdown." ♪ >> welcome back to "countdown." microsoft former chief executive steve ballmer speaking one month after leaving the tech giant and bloomberg was there. for more, let's bring in caroline hyde with the details on what was a fascinating evening. >> wait for it. wait for it. there, on the bottom right. >> bloomberg presents the oxford union debate. with bloomberge having this relationship with the oxford union and he was fascinating. this is the first time he was x ceo. speak as the he is still on the board and one of the bigger shareholders but no longer running a. he spoke very eloquently about the concern that he did not
mentioning it. we are reducing the budget deficit through the aca. i know our colleagues on the other side of the aisle are very careful about budget issues. good, they should be. well health care costs are declining and declining significantly. some of that is due to the recession but almost every expert says much of that is due to the aca. national health care expenditures for instance in 2012 grew by 3.7%, meaning that the growth from 2009 to 2012 was the slowest since government collected information and that was in the 60s. the percentage of health care spending for the first time, the percentage of gdp actually shrunk from 17.3 to 17.2. at the same time the solvency of medicare's hospital insurance fund decreased and costs cut. so this is great news. the bottom line, i know our colleagues on the other side of the aisle think they hit political gold when they attacked the aca and called for its appeal but the american people don't want repeal and secondly as we move on in time the positives of the aca will become more apparent. the negatives that people perceive of aca will decline an
. the white house has made the case that the president's/two deficit has been mitigated. 's slash toidents deficit has been mitigated. on the front page of "the washington post," the republican response. the budget from the republicans will focus on welfare reform. a 204yan will publish page critique, questioning the efficacy of dozens of initiatives and underscoring where republicans say consolidation or spending reductions are needed. democrats line. caller: my name is patrick. i want to talk about the guy that just called talking about the revolt that he wants people to revolt in america. this guy is sitting on his high somewhere,e suburbs eating snickers bars. we are not going to go there. ukraine is a part of russia. it has been a part of russia for the last couple hundred years. we all know that. america, the european union, they have no business in the affairs of russia and ukraine. america needs to clean up its own house before you can go overseas. those folks are fighting for independence. host: that as a last call. we continue on with our discretion about ukraine. josh rogin will
that there are substantial long-term budget deficit issues and a need for a sustainable physical path for the country to focus to the maximum extent possible on fiscal changes that would address the longer run issues that will be associated with rising debt-to-gdp ratio over decades and to try to avoid doing harm to the recovery, and i would take the same general position. >> but in the short run there is a value of additional fiscal stimulation in the economy that will complement what you're already doing and make it easier for you to withdraw the quantitative easing. is that a fair comment? >> i think the economy is beginning to recover and we have made progress. and, you know, at a minimum, i would hope that fiscal policy would do no harm. >> just one other quick question you have looked at an unemployment rate of 6.5% as a point of inflection if you will. but one of the aspects of the current employment situation is that labor force participation is falling that 6.5% might not capture the reality of the current economy and be an adequate sort of measure when you should begin or how you should beg
off its deficits. charles: everybody saying marijuana is this thing like smoking cigarettes with no negative impact to it. there is a negative impact. >> we wish somebody in d.c. just as blunt about health care incentivizing to play the ppano while somebody subsidizes them to leave their job. charles: you can't make this stuff up, exporting goods is suing the ceo of what else for allegedly pretending to be a senior executive, he told the store manager he had a meeting with the ceo and persuaded the employees to show him around in the private back areas and answer questions about the operations. is that balls he or what? >> is this true? a secret agent man pretending he is an employee? charles: a senior executive. >> i think it is a right if it is true, it is a little bit over the top. charles: it is embarrassing to say this guy walked in and anyone could have done that. >> they should give him a coupon, think it is funny. charles: ukraine is spooking the market. your take is next. ♪ see what's new at projectluna.com >> the russians need american technology to develop their
to this aid. difficult steps need to be undertaken to right size gas prices and trim budget deficits, but ukraine should be given a long enough lease so that these necessary reforms don't strangle a nation today dealing with threats to its very existence. second cry me i can't. -- crimea. they have invaded and the very accord they signed guaranteeing crimea's territory. no doubt president putin was sore and no doubt he didn't like the fact that the united states voiced its strong support for the right of a sovereign ukraine to make independent decisions about its future partnerships and no doubt he is infuriated that the ukrainian people are now on their way to getting their way. but this is not a schoolyard. you don't get to push around weaker kids just because you don't like them. this is the 21st century. the reason we belong to organizations like the united nations or the reason we negotiate treaties like the budapest memorandum is because we now understand, after centuries of european war, how destabilizing this kind of behavior is. the irony for russia, of course, is that this
that had obviously unsustainable balance of payment situations and that had current account deficits and that needed to have some kind of sell-off to rebalance and other countries where the fundamentals were fine. frankly, it seems like those fears weren't born out. i'm wondering what you think of the dynamic now give whatn what happening and in particular whether or not you think that this is going to have contagion effects elsewhere. >> this is an important question. the emerging markets are in the middle of a major capital outflow. i think some of the data shows that there's been money leaving emerging markets for over 15 weeks already now. >> 18. >> 18 weeks. and i think that we shouldn't expect this to change the matters very much. i think rebecca's question was spot on. how much has the russian action over the weekend really changed the macroeconomic situation and i think very little. i think that applies to the emerging markets as an asset class as well. >> but let me say something. it hasn't changed the macrosituation but it has changed the approach to risk. look what's going
talk about deficits and debt. we could talk about data. but in the end, treasuries really when it gets nasty, when that tina the only -- that there is no alternative to stocks, that changes rather abruptly when stocks go down. and then tina becomes there is no alternative to being long treasuries. we want to keep cognizant of that. to the end the japanese are doing everything in their power to keep the yen weak, let's look at how all that stimulus and various ways they're trying to goose their economy have panned out. one way they've made good strides on. currently the latest reads is 3.7. now, that is the basic lowest rates since july of '07. during that interim period between '07 and now the high was 5.5. the message to this is is that the japanese may have issues for the last 25 years. but huge high unemployment certainly does not seem to be one of them but they made some inroads. base wage, recent data. this is important. base wages were only up 1/10 year over year. one of the things they're trying to do is goose inflation. if you adjust the wages for inflatio
discrimination by insurance companies, that will reduce the deficit, they need to bring it up for a vote, but they do not have solutions. what they want to do is deny health insurance coverage to millions of americans. that's a shame. and i think we are wasting our time today voting again to turn our backs on the bill that will offer so much to the american people. don't we have anything else to do? all we seem to do is deny science, which is the bill that will be coming up next, the republicans want to stop e.p.a. from dealing with the climate change issue, or denying the rights of people to get health insurance. which the republicans have voted over and over again to do. i urge we vote no on this bill and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentlewoman from kansas is recognized. ms. jenkins: madam speaker, i'd like to yield two minutes to the gentleman from texas, chairman kevin brady, our chair of the ways and means health subcommittee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. brady: madam sp
about each other. that is what we have to get through here. thread forneedles to the trusted deficits. president obama has demonstrated an want to be a partner for peace. he is committed to trying to end the conflict and all of his claims. that? can do let's be candid. some of you doubt it. as it israelis security officials will a test, -- abbas has been against the violence. many hours spent with president abbas. i believe he clearly understands both the tremendous benefit of peace and the great costs of failure. he understands that in terms of his own people, his own grandchildren, the country he hopes to be able to lead, and in terms of the history that be leakers -- beleaguers all. he know the people what never have the self-determination without ending the conflict in a solution that delivers two states for two peoples. and so this prime minister when he looks me in the eye and said i cannot accept a deal with the palestinians that does not make the people of israel safer. we agree 100%. [applause] but i argue, there is a distinction between a unilateral withdrawal from lebanon w
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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